Embodiment

I have spent a large chunk of my adult life seeking embodiment. For some people, that might seem odd – they just feel embodied so naturally, to question what that means might not make sense.

But for me, my body has felt other, and my enemy since I was a teenager, when I went through puberty. Or, I should correct, I was forced through puberty. I didn’t go through it naturally. By 16, I hadn’t had my period, or developed breasts at all, and I spent a month in the hospital undergoing tests as to why. And they didn’t find an answer except my pituitary wasn’t putting out the hormones my body (supposedly) needed.

I wish I’d known then what I know now, but of course, that’s impossible – that was 1977, and the only thing anyone knew to do was give me estrogen to make me go through puberty. And I allowed it.

That was a digression. Since the mid 80s when I realized that my relationship with my body was not good for me or my mental health, and I was miserable, I started a really long series of things to try and mitigate that. I started therapy (I did about 10 years of therapy total.) I started a meditation practice in 1990. In 2012 or so, I discovered Authentic Movement. I also worked with a somatic therapist.

And it got better – all of those things were incredibly helpful. I didn’t have the open warfare with my body that I’d had for so many years, just some quiet battles. I didn’t come to love my body, which was my ultimate goal, but it got better. I wasn’t miserable in my body. And then I hit a wall last year.

Last year I pretty much gave up. I decided that my relationship with my body had hit a plateau – it was where it was going to be – I came to fully accept this flawed relationship with my body. I’d plucked all of the low-hanging and medium-hanging fruit I could. And now, looking back, I realize that that moment was an important one. It was the beginning.

The point of this post is not to actually trace the history of my realization that I wanted to transition – that’s for other posts. But it’s to talk about how simply deciding to transition embodied me, almost instantly.

I now understand something I hadn’t grokked – what it’s like to be at peace with my body – even love it. I have to admit, I don’t love my breasts, but I’m getting rid of those, so that’s fine. And there are still parts that, well, perhaps, I wouldn’t mind being different. But I actually love my body now. I want to take care of it. I want to eat good food. I want to go to the gym. I want to feel things in my body, even if they aren’t super comfortable. The battle is not only over, a love affair has taken it’s place. And this is the gift that I could never have imagined being given. And for that, I have deep gratitude.